Ouch? Pain pitfalls and boring setbacks


Sorry for being out of touch lately... I have forced myself to take out sick-leave from all non urgent activities and keep my computer time to a minimum. Nothing dramatic, just a grinding increase in my daily pain through this whole winter, that has left me slightly more humble and quite reduced.

Once again I have trouble walking to the tram and back, not because I'm paralyzed, simply because I have no energy after struggling with pain around the clock for several months. I've wanted to inspire others by sharing how well I've become, but I'm starting to see that "Healthy" isn't a one way street. Sometimes we get better, sometimes there are setbacks.

I usually get worse during winter, but this winter was really bad... part of me wants so desperately to understand "why?" that I could probably spend a whole day describing different possible pain triggers and health theories. I want to understand because by understanding, I can maybe reduce the possibility of new setbacks. By removing pain-inducing activities/foods/habits, maybe I could get well again?

But whatever the reason for the setbacks, I'm going to spend as much time as possible to rest and recuperate for a while. At the same time I will keep doing what I've learned to do, which is focusing on building health with gradual small changes and adjustments in my daily life.

I have lots of new thoughts to share... just don't know where to start..! .... Well, I guess I can begin with this recent movie. This is anaesthesiologist Elliot Kranes presentation about Chronic Pain at Ted Talks, where he explains why pain is a disease in its own right, describing a new medical understanding which will hopefully lead to more sucessful treatment options. Enjoy :)




3 comments:

  1. Interesting video! Hope you will feel better soon.

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  2. Thank you! I just found your blog and it's great. Very inspirational. I hope you feel better soon as well.

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  3. I could totally relate to you and this blog. You see, I too was born with rheumatoid arthritis and it almost killed me when I was a kid. The good thing was, they were able to do something, and although I’ll have it forever, it rarely shows anymore now that I’m an adult. Pain occasionally flares up every once in a while due to the things you’ve stated here that might trigger it, but I have a very good pain management system. I’m still relatively ignorant of the repercussions and details of this illness because it seems so distant, having climaxed in my early childhood. But I appreciate what you wrote here and it does help people like me. Thank you and better health to you, Anna.

    Betsy Collyer @ US Health Works

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